Supporting the development of students’ schema: a wish list for students arriving for their first year of A Levels

Thanks to Heather Sherman of York College for this blogpost. Heather teaches in an FE College and every year she meets new students from many schools as they embark on their two years of A Level study. Heather writes supportively as to how teachers of students at Key Stage 4 can help with the transition to Key Stage 5. Despite the pressures of the exam … Continue reading Supporting the development of students’ schema: a wish list for students arriving for their first year of A Levels

“Face to face support” – this is what we are doing

Continuing our blogposts related to teaching history in a world with Covid-19 restrictions, Secondary Committee member and assistant head Richard Kennett (@kenradical) shares his department’s thoughts ahout “face-to-face” support for returning Y10s and Y12s.  So I’d imagine like us you are getting ready to welcome Year 10 and Year 12 back in some form in the next few weeks. Although I appreciate there is not … Continue reading “Face to face support” – this is what we are doing

Finding women in the American West

This is the first of a couple of blogposts about the inclusion of women in school history lessons. Many colleagues are arguing that the what and the how of women in the past being taught in our classrooms is leading to woefully unrepresentative history. A key problem is lack of knowledge and resources.  In this blogpost (which first featured on the blog teaandlearning.home.blog) Nicole Ridley (@RidleyHistory) … Continue reading Finding women in the American West

Intersecting history in school – the ‘slot-in’!

Ruth Lingard and Helen Snelson have been leading York area teachers and University of York PGCE trainees to deepen their knowledge of stories from the past that are too often absent from the history classroom. Here they offer the ‘slot-ins’ made so far as a way to help history teachers make the history curriclum more representative of the many, many people who lived in the … Continue reading Intersecting history in school – the ‘slot-in’!

“The curriculum garden…

… In which I was inspired by Ruth Lingard’s post to take Michael Riley’s analogy way too far!” As someone with responsibility for the History curriculum at my school, I often worry about the quality of what we do. This is no false modesty, there are aspects of our curriculum that really aren’t that good. Michael Riley’s conceptualisation of curriculum as a garden continues to … Continue reading “The curriculum garden…

What to do with mock exams – part 2

Thanks to Martyn Bajkowski, Head of History at Pleckgate High School and a member of HA Secondary Committee for continuing this series of three blogposts to help us to make the best possible use of mock exams.  Stage 2 – After their exam Standardisation After students have sat their examination it is important to get hold a range of answers but I would suggest no … Continue reading What to do with mock exams – part 2

What to do with mock exams – part 1

Thanks to Martyn Bajkowski, Head of History at Pleckgate High School and a member of HA Secondary Committee for this, the first of a series of three blogposts to help us to make the best possible use of mock exams.  The Year 11 Mock Exam Season has hit.  Whether your school does one, two or even three sittings of examinations I wanted to share what … Continue reading What to do with mock exams – part 1

Help! – we’re under scrutiny for our poor results…

Last week the Historical Association was contacted by a history teacher member wanting help. The department they work in is under scrutiny for ‘poor’ results. The advice the department had been given was to differentiate all GCSE lessons into 3 or maybe 4 pathways. The department has mixed ability teaching groups with targets ranging from 2-8. They just knew this didn’t seem like a good … Continue reading Help! – we’re under scrutiny for our poor results…