Empowering ourselves to create an anti-racist curriculum: picking off the obstacles one book and one conversation at a time

Thank you to Kate Smee, Head of Humanities at Fairfield School in Bristol for this blogpost. Kate encourages us to keep on thinking and planning and doing what we need to do to teach better history, despite Covid-19. Her twitter handle is on the end of her blogpost.  I am going to start by saying this is not a blog with a definitive road map, … Continue reading Empowering ourselves to create an anti-racist curriculum: picking off the obstacles one book and one conversation at a time

Teaching history well – a reflection

As we come to the end of a very long term and the end of a very long year, Anne Hudson and Gabrielle Reddington share an important conversation. It will hopefully summarise messages received in 2020 and provide food for more thought as we unwind in the break and start to look ahead to 2021. Anne and Gabrielle have taught pupils and trained teachers through … Continue reading Teaching history well – a reflection

Teachers’ perspectives on teaching Black History

Thanks to Simon Beale, Associate Assistant Headteacher and Subject Leader of History & Politics, and co-founder of the History Teacher Book Club, for sharing the key findings of some teacher to teacher sampling that he did earlier this term. It raises interesting points to add to discussions about future work, as it gives a perspective from teachers about what they think will help them make a difference.  … Continue reading Teachers’ perspectives on teaching Black History

Using popular music for learning and teaching about Black lives in modern Britain

David Ingledew, Principal Lecturer in Education (History), University of Hertfordshire, follows up on his previous blogpost to suggest music that can be used as part of your teaching about Black people in modern Britain.  Popular music can be an invaluable resource for learning and teaching about Black lives in Britain from the 1960s to the present day. It can act as an initial stimulus at … Continue reading Using popular music for learning and teaching about Black lives in modern Britain

Inspiration from Teaching History 127 ‘Sense and Sensitivity’

Gemma Hargraves (@History_Girls) of HA Secondary Committee continues our series of blogposts where a colleague reflects on a previous edition of Teaching History, and shares some thoughts about an article within it, with reference to where we are today. I recently read, for the first time TH 127 (June 2007) ‘Sense and Sensitivity’ edition. Although I wasn’t teaching when it was first published, this edition … Continue reading Inspiration from Teaching History 127 ‘Sense and Sensitivity’

Using popular music for learning and teaching the struggle for black equality in the USA

Thanks to David Ingledew, Principal Lecturer in Education (History), University of Hertfordshire, for writing this blogpost. David picks up on previous Teaching History articles and shares some of his extensive knowledge of music to suggest tracks as sources that can be planned into your teaching of this topic. Coming soon, an equivalent list for Britain!   Music can be a powerful resource in history learning and … Continue reading Using popular music for learning and teaching the struggle for black equality in the USA

‘We hear your voices too!’ – shared resources

Last week the History Department at Abbey School (@theabbey_hist) posted some images on Twitter. They have generously agreed to share these. With the theme ‘We hear your voices too!’ they have adapted famous images to bring forward the people in the pictures whose voices are less often heard from the past. Have a look, the effect is fantastic. Used as a display, they make a … Continue reading ‘We hear your voices too!’ – shared resources

“More of that black history stuff again?” – Yes!

The HA is very aware that black history is not a topic that should be confined to a month and is also aware of the way that Black History Month (and other Months) can help to raise awareness and create discussion of the work that needs to be done to make sure the school curriculum is representative. Thanks to Sharon Aninakwa, leader of the Convent of … Continue reading “More of that black history stuff again?” – Yes!

Absent from your curriculum?

The HA Secondary Committee want to support history teachers to be able to access the resources they need to make sure that people are not absent from their history curricula. As part of that effort, we will be drawing attention when we can, via this blog, to really good work being done. Nick Dennis is a Director of Studies and a member of the BAMEed … Continue reading Absent from your curriculum?

Black history resource shared for easy adaptation!

Zara Daswani (@DaswaniZara) is an ITE trainee and is currently on placement in a rural school run by a major northern academy chain. She volunteered to take on a Black History Month initiative for her placement department. They were delighted with it and she has kindly agreed to share her work so we can all use it. Zara enthused her students to research and prepare … Continue reading Black history resource shared for easy adaptation!