What could Lemov’s ideas for Remote Learning look like in History?

Thanks to Alex Fairlamb (@lamb_heart_tea), member of HA Secondary Committee and  coordinator of TMHI, for sharing her work with Lemov’s ideas in the history classroom. You might have come to this post through hearing her on Teachers Talk Radio too! (Apologies – to load Alex’s lovely tables in time, they are screenshoted and the links given underneath – Ed!) Doug Lemov’s ‘Teaching in the Online Classroom’ … Continue reading What could Lemov’s ideas for Remote Learning look like in History?

Using popular music for learning and teaching LGBT+ history

Thanks to David Ingledew (@Ingledew_j), Principal Lecturer in Education (History), University of Hertfordshire for putting together this music collection to help teachers teach LGBT+ history in LGBT+ history month or anytime. David gives us a short back story to 15 key tracks, provides a 40-track playlist and points us to the key Teaching History articles to read for ideas about how to use music in … Continue reading Using popular music for learning and teaching LGBT+ history

Enriching history in a time of Covid

History teachers have pulled off incredible feats since the start of 2021 and are pulling together to get better at helping pupils to get better at history despite the ongoing pandemic disruption. #disthist has been useful for gathering ideas into one place in the twittersphere, the @histassoc remote learning hubs are available and @TMHistoryIcons held a really well-timed distance learning day that was so supportive. … Continue reading Enriching history in a time of Covid

The importance of reading

Thanks to Anne Hooper of Secondary Committee for delving back into those Teaching History archives again. Here she learns more about the very topical matter of reading in the history curriculum from the history teaching past.  In a recent ResearchEd talk Clare Sealy talked passionately about the importance of reading in the curriculum. In recent years we have seen a renaissance regarding the importance of … Continue reading The importance of reading

Teaching history well – a reflection

As we come to the end of a very long term and the end of a very long year, Anne Hudson and Gabrielle Reddington share an important conversation. It will hopefully summarise messages received in 2020 and provide food for more thought as we unwind in the break and start to look ahead to 2021. Anne and Gabrielle have taught pupils and trained teachers through … Continue reading Teaching history well – a reflection

A bit of half-term holiday history fun!

Thanks to Henry Walton, Head of Humanities at Manor CE in York (@HenryWalton5) for collating these history cryptic crossword clues. Cryptic crosswords are a bit like marmite – some history teachers just don’t get the excitement, other history teachers love ’em. Why not have a go? The answers are at the bottom – no peaking! Happy half-term – with apologies to the minority who had … Continue reading A bit of half-term holiday history fun!

Bridging from Y6 to Y7 – transitional history

Thanks to Andrew Sweet, Head of Humanities at Millfield School, for this blogpost in which he shares practical ideas for Year 6 to Year 7 transition and reminds us that we can set high expectations.   Planning for September! Where do we begin? The variables are considerable and quite daunting right now. The possibilities of teaching remotely or in a socially distanced classroom are hard to … Continue reading Bridging from Y6 to Y7 – transitional history

Finding women in the American West

This is the first of a couple of blogposts about the inclusion of women in school history lessons. Many colleagues are arguing that the what and the how of women in the past being taught in our classrooms is leading to woefully unrepresentative history. A key problem is lack of knowledge and resources.  In this blogpost (which first featured on the blog teaandlearning.home.blog) Nicole Ridley (@RidleyHistory) … Continue reading Finding women in the American West

Online learning: similarities and differences

The HA is the subject association for history teachers and as such is working to support both members and non-members at this very strange time. Some resources have been made widely available to everyone. There is also now a HA Resource Hub – please do share it and use it and improve it. Have you also seen the ‘Your HA Virtual Branch‘ initiative? All best … Continue reading Online learning: similarities and differences