How can we foster students’ understanding of the Industrial Revolution, the British Empire and the Transatlantic Slave Trade as interconnected?

Thanks to Sian Ayling (@MsAylingHist), history teacher at Blackfen School for Girls in Sidcup for this blogpost. Sian has wrestled with the need to enable students to see the inter-connection between Britain’s industrial revolution, Empire and transatlantic slave trade. She describes the way that she has planned and developed this work in a way that will be very helpful to colleagues planning the same journey. … Continue reading How can we foster students’ understanding of the Industrial Revolution, the British Empire and the Transatlantic Slave Trade as interconnected?

Decolonising the curriculum one step at a time: lessons on race in the early British Empire

In this blogpost, Jen Thornton (@jen_a_thornton), Head of History at Loreto Grammar School, shares her recent work to improve the history curriculum. Jen started by listening to students, she has gone back to the scholarship to gain the knowledge she needs, she has consulted and worked with colleagues, and she is clear that this is work in progress. Her description of this work and her … Continue reading Decolonising the curriculum one step at a time: lessons on race in the early British Empire

Dealing with the issues from lockdown in the history classroom. Thoughts and perspectives from the HA secondary committee.

This post accompanies the webinar that took place on Friday 5th March 2021. Members of the HA’s Secondary Committee addressed issues from lockdown in the history classroom. This post summarises their ideas, provides the links they referred to and picks up the main themes that emerged in the Q&A. The terms ‘catch up, ‘recovery’ and ‘lost learning’ are negative and don’t capture everything. There are … Continue reading Dealing with the issues from lockdown in the history classroom. Thoughts and perspectives from the HA secondary committee.

What could Lemov’s ideas for Remote Learning look like in History?

Thanks to Alex Fairlamb (@lamb_heart_tea), member of HA Secondary Committee and  coordinator of TMHI, for sharing her work with Lemov’s ideas in the history classroom. You might have come to this post through hearing her on Teachers Talk Radio too! (Apologies – to load Alex’s lovely tables in time, they are screenshoted and the links given underneath – Ed!) Doug Lemov’s ‘Teaching in the Online Classroom’ … Continue reading What could Lemov’s ideas for Remote Learning look like in History?

Tackling Racism: Teaching West African History pre-1700 – Benin

Alex Fairlamb (@lamb_heart_tea), member of HA Secondary Committee reflects here on how her department has taken action over the last year to address the problem of lack of ethnic diversity in the history department’s curriculum at her school. Alex makes clear the process of deep engagement with the history community that inspired, encouraged and enabled her to teach herself the knowledge she lacked and then … Continue reading Tackling Racism: Teaching West African History pre-1700 – Benin

Inspiration from Teaching History 109 ‘Examining History’

We are starting a series of blogposts where a colleague reflects on a previous edition of Teaching History, and shares some thoughts about an article within it, with reference to where we are today. Thanks to Secondary Committee member Martyn Bajkowski (@MrBajkowski) for going first.  At this time of the year, pandemic or not, I find myself reviewing my schemes of work.  One benefit of … Continue reading Inspiration from Teaching History 109 ‘Examining History’

Why this? Why now?

Richard Kennett gave the keynote at the first HA North West forum at the end of January. He has turned his talk into this blogpost so more of us can benefit from his thinking about curriculum.  This blogpost is unashamedly about curriculum. Put simply, curriculum is what stuff we choose to teach. It is not the HOW we teach it. That’s pedagogy. It is not … Continue reading Why this? Why now?

“The curriculum garden…

… In which I was inspired by Ruth Lingard’s post to take Michael Riley’s analogy way too far!” As someone with responsibility for the History curriculum at my school, I often worry about the quality of what we do. This is no false modesty, there are aspects of our curriculum that really aren’t that good. Michael Riley’s conceptualisation of curriculum as a garden continues to … Continue reading “The curriculum garden…