Saints and lice- unravelling the medieval past

Jessie Phillips, History Teacher at Sawston Village College, shares work that relates to cultural history/perspective but with a particular focus on the medieval. Her overarching ideas are based on Wineburg’s conception of finding the ‘familiar within the strange’ and the ‘strange within the familiar’ and using this approach she unravels the attitudes, ideas and values of people in the past. She also explores (very carefully) … Continue reading Saints and lice- unravelling the medieval past

NEW! Support for beginning history teachers

The HA has launched resources to support beginning teachers and those who work with them. Are you thinking of becoming a history teacher? About to train as a history teacher? In your training year? In your first year in post? In the first three years of your history teaching career? Working with beginning teachers? If the answer to any of these Qs is ‘YES!’ than … Continue reading NEW! Support for beginning history teachers

The importance of reading

Thanks to Anne Hooper of Secondary Committee for delving back into those Teaching History archives again. Here she learns more about the very topical matter of reading in the history curriculum from the history teaching past.  In a recent ResearchEd talk Clare Sealy talked passionately about the importance of reading in the curriculum. In recent years we have seen a renaissance regarding the importance of … Continue reading The importance of reading

Teaching history well – a reflection

As we come to the end of a very long term and the end of a very long year, Anne Hudson and Gabrielle Reddington share an important conversation. It will hopefully summarise messages received in 2020 and provide food for more thought as we unwind in the break and start to look ahead to 2021. Anne and Gabrielle have taught pupils and trained teachers through … Continue reading Teaching history well – a reflection

Back to the start of the lesson…

Thanks to Anne Hooper, member of HA Secondary Committee for this blogpost. Anne continues our series reflecting on past Teaching History articles that can be dusted off, revisited and built upon in our practice today. As a young teacher back in 2001, reading Rob Phillips’ article in TH105 had an influence on my classroom practice which is still being felt nearly twenty years later. Using … Continue reading Back to the start of the lesson…

Teachers’ perspectives on teaching Black History

Thanks to Simon Beale, Associate Assistant Headteacher and Subject Leader of History & Politics, and co-founder of the History Teacher Book Club, for sharing the key findings of some teacher to teacher sampling that he did earlier this term. It raises interesting points to add to discussions about future work, as it gives a perspective from teachers about what they think will help them make a difference.  … Continue reading Teachers’ perspectives on teaching Black History

Inspiration about the most controversial of concepts: Empathy

Thanks to Dan Nuttall, who teaches history at Holy Cross College in Bury, for this blogpost. Dan continues our series where colleagues share how past Teaching History articles have made them think and encourage us to revisit them for ourselves.  Recently, I noticed that a decades-old debate between history educators had resurfaced on Twitter. The debate concerned whether it was appropriate or not to ask … Continue reading Inspiration about the most controversial of concepts: Empathy

Pearls of Wisdom from TH Journal 111

Thanks to Anne Hooper (@Hoops752), Lead Practitioner in History at Sandhurst School and member of HA Secondary Committee, for this reflection on Teaching History 111. Anne continues our series of looking back in the archives and reflecting on what colleagues have written that we can learn from today.  As a history teaching community, we are in exciting times regarding reading and scholarship. The History Teachers’ … Continue reading Pearls of Wisdom from TH Journal 111

Using popular music for learning and teaching about Black lives in modern Britain

David Ingledew, Principal Lecturer in Education (History), University of Hertfordshire, follows up on his previous blogpost to suggest music that can be used as part of your teaching about Black people in modern Britain.  Popular music can be an invaluable resource for learning and teaching about Black lives in Britain from the 1960s to the present day. It can act as an initial stimulus at … Continue reading Using popular music for learning and teaching about Black lives in modern Britain