Teaching diversity through footballing history

Thanks to Jonathan Evan-Zoher, who is leading the Football Makes History project for the EuroClio led team, for sharing details about a project that will surely appeal to many!   What is Football Makes History? Football Makes History is a project that will see a unique European team, including a Football Federation, a professional Football Club’s museum, the renowned Anne Frank House, Fare Network, Evenzo Consultancy. … Continue reading Teaching diversity through footballing history

Pearls of Wisdom from Teaching History 120

Continuing our series of looking back to a past edition of Teaching History, Secondary Committee member Emma Bevan has returned to edition 120 from September 2005. Here she gives some thoughts about what she has found there that resonates today.  A rallying cry to be braver in the history classroom When asked “why teach history?”, one of the most recurrent responses is that it allows … Continue reading Pearls of Wisdom from Teaching History 120

Finding women in the American West

This is the first of a couple of blogposts about the inclusion of women in school history lessons. Many colleagues are arguing that the what and the how of women in the past being taught in our classrooms is leading to woefully unrepresentative history. A key problem is lack of knowledge and resources.  In this blogpost (which first featured on the blog teaandlearning.home.blog) Nicole Ridley (@RidleyHistory) … Continue reading Finding women in the American West

Intersecting history in school – the ‘slot-in’!

Ruth Lingard and Helen Snelson have been leading York area teachers and University of York PGCE trainees to deepen their knowledge of stories from the past that are too often absent from the history classroom. Here they offer the ‘slot-ins’ made so far as a way to help history teachers make the history curriclum more representative of the many, many people who lived in the … Continue reading Intersecting history in school – the ‘slot-in’!

‘We hear your voices too!’ – shared resources

Last week the History Department at Abbey School (@theabbey_hist) posted some images on Twitter. They have generously agreed to share these. With the theme ‘We hear your voices too!’ they have adapted famous images to bring forward the people in the pictures whose voices are less often heard from the past. Have a look, the effect is fantastic. Used as a display, they make a … Continue reading ‘We hear your voices too!’ – shared resources

“More of that black history stuff again?” – Yes!

The HA is very aware that black history is not a topic that should be confined to a month and is also aware of the way that Black History Month (and other Months) can help to raise awareness and create discussion of the work that needs to be done to make sure the school curriculum is representative. Thanks to Sharon Aninakwa, leader of the Convent of … Continue reading “More of that black history stuff again?” – Yes!

Revisiting Chartism: The importance of teaching about the ‘Black Man and his Party’

The Secondary Committee at the HA is keen to challenge and support all history teachers to teach about the rich and multi-faceted past. Gemma Hargraves (@History__Girls) has written this blogpost to help colleagues teaching Chartism. In it she provides some interpretations and ideas for resources. As she says: “this isn’t just about pupils seeing themselves in the narratives of the past; be they working class, black … Continue reading Revisiting Chartism: The importance of teaching about the ‘Black Man and his Party’

Women’s Suffrage: history and citizenship resources for schools

When the Historical Association invited me and several other teachers to design new schemes of work for the website, we had two new resources upon which to draw. The first was the new and exciting scholarship that had emerged to coincide with the centenary, including works like Jane Robinson’s Hearts and Minds and Fern Riddell’s Death in Ten Minutes; the second a database designed by … Continue reading Women’s Suffrage: history and citizenship resources for schools

Maps to make WW1 a truly WORLD war

In this post Jason Todd, PGCE Tutor at Oxford University and member of Secondary Committee, gives really helpful advice about how to make your teaching of World War One less limited to the Western Front, and therefore more accurate and respectful to the past, without rewriting everything you do and adding much time to the teaching of the topic… I recently had the privilege of … Continue reading Maps to make WW1 a truly WORLD war