Absent from your curriculum?

The HA Secondary Committee want to support history teachers to be able to access the resources they need to make sure that people are not absent from their history curricula. As part of that effort, we will be drawing attention when we can, via this blog, to really good work being done.

Nick Dennis is a Director of Studies and a member of the BAMEed Network. He was recently asked about to recommend Black and Asian British history texts. Nick says: “Now that knowledge and curriculum seem to be at the very forefront of education debate in England, there is a distinct possibility for students at school to gain an appreciation of how complex, diverse and paradoxical our British ‘island story’ really is.” To help student to do that, we, their history teachers, need knowledge. Nick has started a reading list here and talks about it in his blogpost.

As part of their training, PGCE history trainees have been tracking down resources that can help us teach a more diverse past. Here they are: whose-histories-diversity-in-history-lessons 2019. What they have produced is not a complete list, but is offered as a start to collecting together resources online that can help history teachers to make sure the pasts of all students are taught in their classrooms. It is there to be improved.

In a recent post we drew attention to the excellent African Kingdoms resources. These are written for A Level, but provide the knowledge teachers make to design resources for KS3. Here is a collection of articles on decolonising the classroom. And here is an article about a controversial V&A exhibition in 2018.

Meanwhile, in Teaching History 173 you can find an article about teaching the history of people with disabilities, including links to the resources explained.

Please do join in the #OBHD conversation so we can all work together to improve our teaching and the content of our curricula. You can find the HA on Facebook and @histassoc and of course online at https://www.history.org.uk/

 

 

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